37 Early Menopause Symptoms and Signs

The menopause is considered as the duration when your periods end for good. It is a natural part of growing older and happens with everyone when your ovaries discontinue producing the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. Estrogen plays an important role in puberty and fertility, which includes regulating the menstrual cycle. Moreover, it has many other physiological impacts — it stimulates the development of your skeleton and helps uphold healthy bones and muscles, as well as helps in protecting your heart and blood vessels.

Menopause Menopause symptoms Menopause symptoms age 50 Menopause symptoms age 47 Symptoms of menopause at 46 Signs of menopause at 43 Signs of menopause at 45 Menopause symptoms age 55 menopause causes

Picture Source: ubiquinol

At menopause, changes appear in many parts of the body – not only the reproductive organs. This causes signs and symptoms and this can be unpleasant for some women. For all those women who get significant signs and symptoms, a variety of useful treatments is available, it is therefore important to speak with your health care provider about your menopause signs and symptoms.

What is the Perimenopause?

The period from when you begin to get menopausal signs and symptoms to when your periods ultimately end completely is called the perimenopause. Throughout the perimenopause the ovaries begin to function erratically and slowdown in work. Your periods will become irregular and can become lighter or heavier than regular periods. You might also have signs and symptoms of estrogen shortage, such as hot flushes, vaginal dryness and sweats.

The perimenopause can last about 4 to 8 years on an average, until a woman’s final period. You are considered to be postmenopausal once you’ve had 12 continuous months of no periods.

When Does Menopause Occur?

Menopause occurs between 45 and 55 years of age for almost all women, with an average age of 51. Menopause that happens between the ages of 40 and 45 is known as early menopause and the menopause that happens before the age of 40 is called premature menopause.

Around 1 % of Australian women possess spontaneous premature menopause. Premature menopause may also take place if your ovaries are removed surgically, or in case you have certain kinds of chemotherapy or radiotherapy for cancer problems that can harm your ovaries. At times when dealing with these cases menopause occurs suddenly instead of slowly and steadily which can be upsetting for those who have not prepared themselves.
Criteria associated with early and premature menopause include: being a smoker;

  • Family history
  • Had chemotherapy
  • Premature Ovarian Insufficiency (POI), which may be caused by certain genetic abnormalities.
  • Had radiation therapy
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Metabolic disorders

Early Signs and Symptoms of Menopause:

The initial thing you may observe is that your periods could become irregular — shorter or longer, with heavier or lighter bleeding, or maybe different lengths of time between periods. Obviously, in case you are noticing any specific changes in your bleeding, it is necessary you consult your personal doctor to discard any medical problems.

You may notice that your skin gets drier or your waistline turns into thicker at the expense of your hips and thighs. The common signs and symptoms most people will associate with menopause consider the following:

  • Irregular periods
  • Hot flushes
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Urinary problems
  • Mood changes
  • Night sweats
  • Loss of libido
  • Fatigue
  • Hair thinning or hair loss
  • Sleeping disorders
  • Difficulty in concentrating
  • Memory lapses
  • Pain in joints and muscles
  • Backache
  • Weight gain
  • Light headed feelings
  • Headache
  • Dizziness

However, you might not get these symptoms — or even any of the above mentioned. Many women do not have these adverse effects and some are not even aware of any other physical changes in their body. Some women might notice these signs and symptoms starting before they have any alterations with their periods and menstrual cycle.

Signs and symptoms do not last long in some women, but one should be aware of lower estrogen levels. After the menopause, some may have long-term effects on some parts of your body and they result in some health problems.

Signs and Symptoms of Menopause at the Age of 43:

Some women may experience menopause at an early stage; at the age of 43, which can lead her towards tiredness, weakness, body ache, etc. below is the list of signs and symptoms which can occur due to menopause at the age of 43:

  • Abdominal bloating
  • Aggression and anger
  • Irregular periods
  • Anxiety
  • Loss of sexual desire
  • Breast tenderness
  • Hot flushes
  • Night sweats
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Urinary problems
  • Mood swings

Signs and Symptoms of Menopause at the Age of 45:

Some women may experience menopause at an early stage; at the age of 45, which can make her feel low and weakness in the body. Following is the list of signs and symptoms which can occur due to menopause at the age of 45:

  • Irregular periods
  • Anxiety
  • Loss of libido
  • Hot flushes
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Sleeping disorders
  • Irritability
  • Changes in the mood
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Pain in muscles and joints

Signs and Symptoms of Menopause at the Age of 46:

Many women experience menopauses at the age of 46 early stage; at the age of 46, which can result in irregular periods, changes in mood fatigue, etc. Following is the list of signs and symptoms which can occur due to menopause at the age of 45:

  • Irregular periods
  • Nights sweats
  • Hot flushes
  • Libido loss
  • Mood swings
  • Muscular weakness
  • Exhaustion
  • Constipation
  • Tiredness
  • Breast tenderness
  • Dryness in vagina
  • Hair loss
  • Headache

Signs and Symptoms of Menopause at the Age of 47:

Most women start getting signs and symptoms of menopause at the age of 47, which can make them feel tired, bloated tummy, hot flushes or mood swings, etc. Following is the list of signs and symptoms which can occur due to menopause at the age of 47:

  • Irregular periods
  • Anxiety
  • Hair loss
  • Hot flushes
  • Night sweats
  • Loss of sexual desire
  • Breast cysts
  • Insomnia
  • Blood clots
  • Fibroids
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Exhaustion
  • Fatigue

Signs and Symptoms of Menopause at the Age of 50:

Signs and symptoms of Menopause can also start occurring at the age of 50 also which can result in irregular periods, changes in mood fatigue, etc. Following is the list of signs and symptoms which can occur due to menopause at the age of 50:

  • Irregular periods
  • Nights sweats
  • Hot flushes
  • Libido loss
  • Mood swings
  • Muscular weakness
  • Exhaustion
  • Constipation
  • Tiredness
  • Breast tenderness
  • Dryness in vagina
  • Hair loss
  • Headache

Signs and Symptoms of Menopause at the Age of 55:

Many women inter into the stage of menopause at the age of 55 also. Following is the list of signs and symptoms which can occur due to menopause at the age of 55:

  • Irregular periods
  • Anxiety
  • Loss of libido
  • Hot flushes
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Insomnia
  • Sleeping disorders
  • Irritability
  • Changes in the mood
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Pain in muscles and joints

Signs and Symptoms of Menopause in detail:

Below is the list of signs and symptoms of menopause:

1. Hot Flushes: Hot flushes are the most commonly encountered factor women ask for treatment. They are sudden sensations of heat that usually rise from your body chest to your face and neck. They could last a period ranging from a few seconds to several minutes and usually stimulate a sweating — at times they can be followed by a chill.

Hot flushes generally happen at night and disturb your sleep. Some women experience them many times a day they usually might go on for up to 5 years or even more. They generally start developing before your periods stops and continue for a year or 2 later.

Some women think that hot weather conditions, constrained spaces, hot drinks, hot and spicy foods, tension, caffeine, smoking or alcoholic beverages make hot flushes worse, while staying away from this stuff can help.

Other things that may help include things like:

  • wearing layers of such clothes which can be easily removed or put back on;
  • using hand-held fan;
  • keeping your face wet by using water spray;
  • learn to meditate;
  • using relaxation techniques such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) might be recommended by your physician if you experience hot flushes and night sweats frequently.

Otherwise, medicines such as certain kinds of antidepressants (e.g. venlafaxine, paroxetine), anticonvulsant medicines (e.g. gabapentin) and some medicines used for treating high blood pressure levels (e.g. clonidine) have shown their effect in treating hot flushes.

2. Vaginal Dryness: Drops in estrogen level may cause your vagina and vulva to become drier and the labia to get thinner, which could result in itching, irritation or pain while having sex. You may have to make use of a personal lubrication or vaginal moisturizer (available at pharmacies) to make having sex much easier and more comfortable.

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) can be useful for relieving vaginal dryness and could be regarded if non-hormonal treatments are not effective. As well as oral Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT), one can find estrogen creams (Overstain Cream) or pessaries (Overstain Ovule, Vague Low) which is often applied straight away to the vagina. Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) provided this way can effectively deal with various vaginal and urinary signs and symptoms, and reduces the threats of side-effects as compared to Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) taken orally.

Signs and symptoms of itchiness can be aided by making use of soap substitutes (for example sorbolene) when washing your genital area and by putting on cotton under-wear.

3. Urinary Problems: Weakening of the bladder as well as thinning of the opening of the bladder (the urethra) can happen with the menopause, which causes leaking of urine whenever you laugh, cough or sneeze. else you could get painful urination or the desire to go to the washroom more often. You can even become more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs).

your personal doctor or physiotherapist may provide you with pelvic floor exercises that will help improve muscle tone and decrease troubles with urinary incontinence. Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) presented as vaginal estrogen (creams or pessaries) also has been presented to be effective in minimizing urinary symptoms of menopause.

4. Mood Changes: Menopause can cause changes in mood for example increased anxiousness, increased irritation and feelings of unhappiness or depression symptoms.

Even though lots of women experience mood swings around menopause, this is not very clear whether these types of changes are associated with reduced estrogen levels or other issues which can coincide with this time in your life, for example career pressures, children leaving behind home or unexpectedly finding yourself taking care of elderly parents.

Whilst mood may improve with Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT), it may not be routinely recommended for avoiding or dealing with depression symptoms. Yoga and methods such as meditating or consciousness may help improve state of mind and reduce anxiousness.

5. Night Sweats: Night sweats are categorized as serious hot flushes that take place while sleeping along with intense bouts of sweat. Often known as “sleep hyperhidrosis”, night sweats are not actually a sleep problem, but a very common sweating disorder that happens while sleeping in menopausal females. All these instances of night time sweating vary in severity from moderate to intense, that can occur due to hormonal imbalance coupled with environmental elements, for example an overly warm sleeping world.
For most women, the encounter of night sweats is so intense that it interrupts sleep, which may increase irritation and stress in a woman’s waking life. Night sweats could also be result of under-lying medical conditions, so it is important to get to the root of the issue before planning treatment plans.

6. Loss of Libido: Almost everyone experiences peaks and valleys in sexual desire, an ebb and movement in sex drive that can be caused due to any of a variety of aspects. Yet somehow, for women under-going menopause, this unexpected decrease in desire for sexual activity or intimacy may be troubling. In menopausal women, the principal cause of reduced sex drive is hormonal fluctuations, predominantly androgen deficiency. Loss in libido could also be caused by some other menopause signs and symptoms themselves, for example vaginal dryness or anxiety, or by prescribed drugs, including medication recommended to cure menopause signs and symptoms. It is essential not to confuse sexual desire with sexual function.

7. Fatigue: Fatigue, the most common menopause signs and symptoms, is called as a continuous and persistent feeling of a weakness, exhaustion, and reduced energy levels, instead of just sleepiness or drowsiness. Some other characteristics of fatigue might include apathy, frustration, and decreased attention period. Crashing tiredness is a phenomenon which comes on unexpectedly, leaving behind a woman without any energy and struggling to continue her activity.

Fatigue in menopause is brought on by hormonal alterations; hormones such as estrogen control energy utilization at a cellular level, and when hormone levels falls during menopause, so too do energy levels. Persistent fatigue in menopause can have a radical effect on everyday life, putting a worry on important relationships, work efficiency, and quality of life, so dealing with the under-lying hormonal disturbance is essential to regain energy levels.

8. Weight Gain: one can gain weight around the waist due to changes in hormones because of menopause. Low testosterone levels can decrease the metabolic rate it means that from menopause onwards women will require few calories only; thus, women who do not discontinue to eat as earlier will gain weight by default. Therefore, healthy diet and exercise are necessary to maintain body’s metabolic rate.

9. Memory Lapses: one of the signs of menopause is memory loss or memory lapse. Misplaced keys, forgetting appointments, missing trains or birthdays, etc. are the signs of memory lapse. Memory loss affects peoples one way or other. However, if it happens again and again one should consult the doctor immediately else it can make u feel nervous or may result in stress or depression.

10. Sleeping Disorders: waking up several times during night time or signs like insomnia are the signs and symptoms of menopause. Researchers say that most of the women start feeling insomnia from five to seven years before entering menopause. Some believe that insomnia is due to night sweats.

This can also have a strain on professional or personal relationships and cause emotional disturbances. Women wake up several times during the night are tired and cannot concentrate during the day. The sleep cycle is highly important for overall well-being, and sleep deprivation can negatively impact health in many ways.

11. Anxiety: Anxiety is an indefinite or strong feeling caused by physical or mental conditions, symbolized by feelings of worry and loss of emotional control. Anxiety or feelings of anxiousness are also associated with panic attacks, and can patent as physical symptoms such as rapid heartbeat, shortness of breath, and palpitations. Anxiety during menopause is caused by the sudden drop in estrogen levels circulating in the body, which reduce the production of neurotransmitters accountable for mood regulation, such as serotonin and dopamine.

12. Irritability: Irritability during menopause is caused by hormonal changes in the body, whereas low levels of circulating estrogen have contrary effect on the neurotransmitters in the brain that are responsible for regulating one’s mood.

The frequency of anxiety can vary from a one-time event to recurrent episodes. Early diagnosis may aid a quick recovery, prevent the disorder from becoming worse, and possibly prevent the disorder from developing into depression, so it is important to seek medical treatment for this signs and symptoms.

13. Difficulty in Concentration: In the lead-up to the menopause, most women are worried to find they possess trouble remembering things, experience mental and emotional blocks, or difficulties in concentrating. This is often confusing or worrying for most women, that will have a significant impact on all factors in everyday life. The major reason why these signs and symptoms takes place during menopause is hormonal fluctuations, particularly estrogen deficiency. However, having insufficient sleep or sleep disorder may also help cause memory problems and result in difficulty concentrating, along with the nagging pain of further physiological menopause signs and symptoms.

After under-lying medical ailments are discounted as a reason for disorientation, confusion, or the lack of concentration, it is important to examine hormone levels. Targeting and dealing with the under-lying hormonal fluctuations will assist a woman get over difficulty concentrating.

14. Dizziness: Dizziness is a transient spinning feeling, which can be combined with a sensation of lightheadedness or unsteadiness, and even the incapability to maintain balance upon standing up or while walking. Attacks may survive for as little as a few mere seconds, but will make a woman experience out of sorts for a prolonged time, or might even result in falls, that may affect her daily home and professional life.Dizziness is an indication of numerous medical conditions; despite this, it is a possible indicator of menopause, brought on by fluctuations in hormonal levels such as estrogen. Women that experience unexplained dizzy spells need to talk to their medical professional to distinguish between trivial problems, severe illnesses, and dizziness brought on by hormonal fluctuations

15. Incontinence: Incontinence in menopausal women is divided into three types. Stress incontinence is the unintentional release of urine while laughing, coughing, sneezing, or due to over-exertion. This normally happens when the internal muscles neglect to work effectively, because of growing older, surgery, or childbirth. With urge incontinence, the bladder develops a “mind of its own,” shrinking and emptying whenever full despite an individual’s conscious challenging work to withstand. Overflow incontinence is the paucity of the feeling of a full bladder, where accidental urination occurs because the person does not realize the bladder is full.
A woman’s own experience of incontinence may possibly include any combination of these. Most of these types of incontinence may be worrying and awkward for menopausal women, but effective treatments can be found for this common ailment.

16. Panic Disorder: Panic disorder consists of considerable and incapacitating emotional attacks characterised by unexpected and overpowering fear and anxiousness. These types of emotions can be intensive, and induced by physical or psychological circumstances. An attack of panic disorder might involve speedy heartrate, sense of fear, irregular breathing, uneasiness, and feelings of significant terror. These panic “attacks” ranges in frequency from just one episode to regular occurrences.

17. Bloating: Bloating happens in most women all through their lives, because of digestive problems or as a part of PMS. This sign and symptom is identified by a swollen tummy, a sensation of tightness, and uneasiness or pain in the belly area. Usually, this originates from intestinal gas brought on by poor food transit; it is due to low levels of bile, that is caused by estrogen inadequacy. One other reason for bloating can be lactose intolerance, or the body’s rejection of dairy food items. As people grow older, they produce less lactase – the enzyme needed to digest lactose.

18. Allergies: Allergic reactions may be a frustrating menopause sign and symptom, because they can damage daily life. Most ladies merely experience “mild” signs and symptoms for example intense rashes, sneezing and itchy eyes, but when it comes to extreme allergy symptoms such as swelling, wooziness, and cramping, it is very important to seek necessary medical care. Mild signs and symptoms might be avoided by making easy modifications, as well as by looking after the underlying hormonal fluctuations.

19. Brittle Nails: Nail physical appearance can say plenty about a person’s general health and habits. There are plenty of nail changes that occur at the time of menopause that might reveal an underlying issue, yet the most popular is brittle nails, or nails that are much softer, or that damage, split, or break horizontally across the top of the nail. This may indicate a nutritional deficiency; however, in menopausal women brittle nails are generally due to hormonal fluctuations. Low estrogen levels cause dehydration in your body, leading to dryness of the skin, hair, and nails.

20. Changes in Odor: Alterations in body odor could make the menopausal women having them very self-conscious. Menopausal hormonal alterations result in an increase in sweat production, due to physical menopause signs and symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, or psychological signs and symptoms such as anxiety and panic disorder. This rise in sweat production can result in increased body smell, even while sustaining a good personal hygiene regimen.

21. Irregular Heartbeat: Uneven heart beat is one of the more concerning menopause signs and symptoms. Bouts of pounding, speedy heart beat frighten many women dues to their sudden start and the difficulty in calming them. Among the reasons behind these signs and symptoms during menopause is hormonal fluctuations. Estrogen insufficiency may over-stimulate the nervous and circulatory systems, leading to uneven heart beat and heart palpitations, along with certain arrhythmia.

22. Depression: Feelings of unhappiness can be normal, acceptable, and even required during life’s setbacks or losses. Feeling blue or disappointed in short time periods without reason or warning can be normal and common. However, if such feelings continue or damage daily life, it may signal a depressive disorder. The seriousness and length of the sad feelings, as well as the occurrence of other signs and symptoms, are elements that differentiate ordinary unhappiness from a depressive disorder. Other signs and symptoms of depression include things like lack of curiosity about usual routines, sleep and eating issues, and elimination from family and friends.

23. Anxiety: Anxiety is a vague or intensive sensation due to physical or psychological problems, typified by emotions of agitation and lack of emotional control Anxiety and feelings of stress are associated with panic and anxiety attacks, that can appear as physical signs and symptoms for example rapid heartbeat, breathing difficulties, and heart palpitations. o at the time of menopause is brought on by the sudden decrease in estrogen levels circulating in your body, which decrease the manufacturing of neurotransmitters liable for mood control, such as serotonin and dopamine.

24. Breast Pain: The specific fluctuations of hormones which causes breast pain is exclusive to each individual woman, so pain in breast may appear at various times or maybe at different intensities in individual women. A woman must consult her doctor if the pain is extreme or persists for 2 months or even more, as well as if the breast pain is accompanied with a breast lump, nipple dis-charge, or any unusual signs and symptoms.

25. Breast Cysts: Breast cysts, tenderness, or breast physical distress in one or both breasts are symptomatic of hormonal changes, and as such frequently precedes or accompanies menstrual periods, that will also happen during pregnancy, post-partum, and menopause. The fluctuations of hormones which causes breast pain is exclusive to each individual woman, therefore breast pain may occur at different occasions or at different intensities in individual women

26. Headaches: Most women with regular menstrual cycles have headaches or migraines right before their periods or at ovulation. These types of headaches, sometimes known as “menstrual migraines”, occur whenever estrogen levels fall through the menstrual cycle. Therefore, when the body begins slowing down its production of estrogen because of menopause, a woman might experience more and even worse headaches. Mild to severe headaches that are followed by confusion or high fever may indicate a dangerous health problem and involve the immediate notice of your doctor.

27. Joint Pain: Joint pain is among the most common signs and symptoms of the menopause. It can be considered that over fifty percent of all postmenopausal females encounter with varying degrees of joint pain. Joint pain is an inexplicable soreness in muscles and joints, which happens to be unrelated to trauma or workout, still may be associated with the effects of ever-changing hormone levels on the immune system. Estrogen prevents inflammation in the joints, therefore low levels of estrogen throughout menopause can result in increased circumstances of inflammation, and therefore increased joint pain.

28. Gum Problems: Gum issues are normal among menopausal women; even though these can be caused by poor dental hygiene, also they are caused by menopausal hormonal changes, primarily estrogen insufficiency. The most popular of the gum problems experienced in the menopause is gingivitis, or inflammation and light bleeding of the gums. Unattended, gum problems can cause tooth loss, bacterial infections, and heart disease, therefore it is important to seek out remedy for gum problems in menopause.

29. Sensation of Electric Shocks: This symptom reveals an unusual “electric” sensation, like the feeling of a rubber band snapping in the layer of tissues between skin and muscle, or, whenever it appears as a precursor to a hot flash, it is usually felt across the head. Electric shocks normally only take place for a moment; however, it can certainly still be quite an unpleasant sensation. The reason for electric shock sensation in the menopause is likely related to the effect of fluctuating estrogen levels on the cardiovascular and nervous systems.

30. Burning Tongue: The disorder has always been associated with a variety of circumstances, including the menopause. In menopause, low estrogen levels are said to damage bitter taste buds in the mouth, setting off the surrounding pain neurons. Women that possess persistent pain or tenderness in their tongue, lips, gums, or other areas of their mouth area ought to seek the advice of their medical doctor.

31. Tingling Extremities: Tingling extremities can also be a symptom of any number of problems, including anxiety, poor blood circulation, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, or a tumor. Any unexplained tingling that affects one side of the body or is accompanied by muscle weakness warrants immediate medical attention.

32. Muscle Tension: Muscle tension is a very common symptom of the menopause, as low estrogen levels result in a rise in cortisol, identified primarily as the stress hormone. Extended higher levels of cortisol cause the muscles within the body to tighten up and become tired.

33. Itchy Skin: Itchy skin is one of the initial menopause signs and symptoms to show up since collagen loss is more rapid at the start of the menopause. It is possible that premature menopause also results in more rapid collagen loss. These types of skin alterations may also make a woman feel and look a little older than she used to. To have the ability to overcome itchy skin signs and symptoms, a woman should first have to address her hormonal fluctuations.

34. Digestive Problems: Digestive problems are called as changes in gastrointestinal function, with signs and symptoms such as extreme gas production, gastrointestinal cramps, and nausea. There can be many reasons why menopausal women could possibly be experiencing more digestive issues than previously: hormonal imbalance interrupts the natural transit of foods in the gut, and tension has an adverse impact on the normal working of hormones.

35. Aggression: The cells cannot absorb progesterone with elevated levels of circulating adrenaline, so the limbic region of the brain, which has the greatest concentration of progesterone receptors in the body, is affected. The limbic system is an area in our brain controlling rage, violence, panic, anxiety, sleep, hormones, depression, learning and our immune response. Progesterone inhibits the release of adrenaline and noradrenaline, thereby preventing aggression.

36. Fibroids: Very heavy bleeding, clots, extended periods, with a short break in between are the hallmark of fibroids. They often result in irregular, occasionally painful periods, and pressure (because of their size and number). Bleeding is usually the most common feature.

37. Ovarian Cysts: Ovarian cysts are abnormal sacs filled with liquid or semi-solid matter found in the ovary. They can vary in size from one or two centimetres to ten or more centimetres. Almost all premenopausal women will have them at some time or another, but only about 15% of menopausal women experience them.

What Health Problems are Associated with Menopause?

Osteoporosis

Osteoporosis (, porous bones) means the loss in bone mass and thinning and deteriorating of bone. Bone is a living tissue in steady condition of flux; the state of our bones is a balance between the volume of bone being laid down and the volume of bone being re-absorbed into the body. Everyone has a minor imbalance after about the age of 30 because the volume of bone being produced is considerably less than the volume which is re-absorbed into the body. This results in gradually losing bone thickness. In women, however, at the menopause, bone turnover increases. This exacerbates the loss and the volume of bone formed cannot maintain the amount lost and so the bones become thinner.  Other factors that increase your risk of osteoporosis include:

  • low calcium intake (for example, if you do not eat much cheese, milk and green vegetables)
  • smoking
  • drinking alcohol
  • a lack of weight-bearing exercise.

Monitoring your daily diet and performing weight-bearing exercises such as walking, jogging sessions, and dancing can help prevent loss in bone mass. Acquiring enough vitamin D by appropriate exposure to sun light with lesser amounts from the eating habits also helps keep bones strong.

Hormone replacement therapy decreases the risk of osteoporosis and fractures, however, because of the risks related to its long-term use, it is far from a routine treatment for avoiding or treating osteoporosis. HRT can be considered for preventing osteoporosis in many younger women that also have complicated menopausal signs and symptoms.

How Can I make my Menopause Easier?

Each woman is going to experience the menopause in a unique way and there is no single therapy that will match everyone. Menopause is a completely natural phenomenon, not a disease, many women encounter no or minimal signs and symptoms and involve no specific treatment. However, for some it can be unpleasant period. There are many things you can do to help yourself and make the transition easier. Here are some of them.

  • Understanding that this is a normal part of life and allowing yourself time to adjust, and pamper yourself.
  • Relaxing and doing anything which helps cut down stress.
  • Exercising regularly and keeping fit. Weight-bearing exercise is particularly helpful for your bones.
  • Eating a well-balanced diet and maintaining a healthy body weight.
  • Talking to a counsellor if you feel it would help.

Consult your doctor and ensure he or she understands how you are feeling now. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to your usual doctor, you might prefer to visit a women’s health center or Family Planning clinic. Discussing the options available to you will help you decide on the path that’s best for you based on your symptoms and needs.

About the author

Munira Saleh

Hello Readers! I am Munira Saleh, Running The OnlyWomenStuff Blog. Formerly a Teacher, my passion for writing got me into Blogging. I started this blog to provide a platform where i could post all things related to women. I use this medium to create awareness, explore womanhood and share my experience of being a woman; right from Beauty, Fashion and Women’s Health Care to beyond. Connect with me to know more!

1 Comment

  • Menopause is a time of great hormonal fluctuations.

    When doctors measure hormone levels in perimenopause, the years just before the periods finally stop they find that the levels can change markedly from day to day.

    This can lead to emotional upheaval that can last for several years.

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